Using warm up to learn about opponent

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Magwitch, Jan 30, 2020.

  1. Magwitch

    Magwitch Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2019
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Australia
    Just wondering if anyone had tips for learning about a player's strengths and weaknesses during the warm up if you haven't seen the person play before. I came over from table tennis, and I saw a video on this in table tennis recommending giving the person a variety of different balls to see how they react. Not sure whether that sort of advice is applicable to badminton.
     
  2. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    40,228
    Likes Received:
    1,234
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    It is hard to say if it is gonna be accurate. I can see different scenarios. eg.

    If you try to smash at your opponent during warm up, how hard are you gonna smash? if you smash mid-strength, he failed to return it, it can be: he is weak, or he just wasn't paying attention, or he might even try to fake u out by not showing his strength!

    however, if you smash all out at him and he returns it like it was nothing, then you are definitely in trouble! :D

    fact is, most ppl don't go 100% during warmup and won't chase shots all the way. you can have some indication of their general strength by watching their technique, but won't be a full indicator until points are counted.
     
    boby, Magwitch and speCulatius like this.
  3. Budi

    Budi Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2019
    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    197
    Location:
    Indonesia
    Agree with Kwun.
    On lower level it might be possible. You will know is he good or not just by seeing how he hit the shuttle. No matter how good they fake it out, habit cant be removed easily. From warm up you could guest its a begineer or not.

    But on intermediate above, its kinda hard to know one true skill as all of them have good basic. & yes during warm up i wont take thing seriously. If the bird fall, then let it fall. I wont run to catch it & waste my stamina more than what it should be. Smashing, i wont even do full smash. Im just doing it for warming up & gauge my power.
     
    Magwitch and kwun like this.
  4. Pagz

    Pagz Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2019
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Germany
    You could play a few clears to your opponents backhand side. That's something even advanced players struggle with sometimes (backhand clear and drop).
    But in general I wouldn't read too much into your opponent just from warm up. Just pay attention during the first few points, that should give you much more accurate information about your opponents strenghts and weaknesses.
     
    Magwitch likes this.
  5. Cesium

    Cesium Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2018
    Messages:
    254
    Likes Received:
    73
    Occupation:
    Web Developer
    Location:
    Canada
    Usually going into a tournament we know all the top 3 players already. But then again maybe we just have a really small badminton scene
     
  6. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    40,228
    Likes Received:
    1,234
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    sometimes you can just tell how good they are by the way they hold their racket and get ready. not even a hit is needed. but not always! :cool:
     
  7. boby

    boby Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2018
    Messages:
    104
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    indonesia
    this scenario usually happened for recreational player on 1st game only. I've some habits clear and drive strokes warmup that's make me know a bit information about power and techniques level from my opponent.

    1st variety clear, easy clear and hard attacking clear we can see they techniques from the posture and the power from the return. try to give some a good smash and drop to make they give serious return defense and smash also.

    2nd variety aim fast drive exchange, with this stroke we'll get more information about they techniques. by how they generates power and the qualities return shot from them.

    when we had many experiences to play with various opponent level, usually we can feel the opponent is lower, same, or higher level than us. based on that's warmup scenarios. although it isn't 100% correct. :)
     
    LenaicM and kwun like this.
  8. ucantseeme

    ucantseeme Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2010
    Messages:
    4,489
    Likes Received:
    1,645
    Occupation:
    ZFII
    Location:
    ZFII
    Normally you play at tournaments group first until you reach the K.O. system. Except the very first game you have the chance to watch any potential opponent in your group and in the K.O rounds. If your level is not low, you can be sure that your opponent can make any shot.

    If you face an opponent it doesn't really mean that you will get ingame the chance to get many points from them. Serious players know clearly their strength and weakness and will cover them. I estimate you refer this to singles and honestly you know nothing about their tactics and their footwork, prefered shots etc. from the warm up. I would advice to watch your opponents during early stage at tournament and do your checklist for weakness in the first few points. You play a whole court singles.

    The warm up to normally a routine to get ready and get comfortable in the enviroment not something to convince the opponent he will win or loose. The game will tell. I'm somebody who get warm slowly and won't chase anything on court or would full smash at you. I will also play relaxed clears. Means nothing that you can await the same in the game.
     
    kwun likes this.
  9. Magwitch

    Magwitch Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2019
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Australia
    One thing I've learned is that if all you know of a person before a match is a rating or a result they had against some player, this isn't necessarily a reliable indicator of how tough an opponent they'll be. In table tennis some of the young juniors have lower ratings than deserved because of playing above age groups and rarely winning matches.
     

Share This Page