Victor VE-50

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by AdamMorin, Dec 11, 2022.

  1. viver

    viver Regular Member

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    This might be a dumb question, I have been looking for an explanation but unsuccessfully...
    In the past, when using the wooden and aluminum rackets, the practice to stringing the crosses in badminton rackets was Top Down. Stringing the crosses starting from the bottom would change the racket head form and was an absolute NO NO. What is the reason now to do the crosses starting from the bottom?

    My stringing machine is an old 30 years from Fleet (now Felet I think) and I string only mine and my wife's rackets, and occasionally for a friend - I do the crosses bottom to top now, as seen in the instructional videos in Youtube. But I still like to do a good job on the rackets even though is just for my own rackets!

    Thank you, and apologies if this is a dumb question.
     
  2. slim416

    slim416 New Member

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    Yonex changed their suggested stringing patterns from top down to bottom up around 15 or so years ago around the same time the first nanospeed rackets were introduced as racket frames were getting thinner and thinner. Frames are usually thicker on the bottom so the bottom-up method would put less stress on the frame.
     
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  3. kakinami

    kakinami Regular Member

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    At the 2005 Badminton World Championships in Anaheim A stringer was doing a racket at 34 pounds for a Korean player, he was stringing top down and broke 3 rackets in a row, I believe he was on machine #4. The 4th racket he went bottom up and had no problem. I believe due to the higher tension players are using now a days, it is recommended to go bottom up. With the higher tensions the bottom of the frame becomes weaker with the higher tensions, that is where they were breaking when the stringer was going top down at the 4 or 7 oclock position.

    So maybe my guess to your question is because of the higher tensions players are using now, which makes the bottom of the frame weaker with the higher tensions.
     
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  4. viver

    viver Regular Member

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    Thank you very much for your reply.

    I have been trying to find on the internet the answer to my question for sometime... I did run into a tennis rackets stringing forum, maybe about 4/5 years ago where the stringers there favored the crosses from top to bottom - my understanding for their reasoning was that the tension/stress builds to the direction of the stringing. The 4/5 and 7/8 o'clock being the stronger of the racket frame, stringing the crosses from top to bottom, the tension would be higher at the bottom, that was why it recommended (also according to different rackets manufacturers) the doing the crosses from top to bottom.

    I would also like to say a thank you here for showing the Gudgeon knot. I have been practicing it in my stringing job, it's not perfect but I think I am getting better at it.
     
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  5. AdamMorin

    AdamMorin Regular Member

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    I keep getting mixed results when looking into tension distribution.

    If I want to string a racket at 25 lbs. Some say you just string it all at 25 and it evens out as you hit. Others say you string mains at 25 and crosses at 27 due to weaving displacement.

    Is there any true proven method that gives you the true lbs you are looking for?
     
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  6. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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    As I understand it, it was basically Yonex saying

    "we were breaking rackets with top-down, and it stopped when we went bottom-up, so that's how we do it now"

    You can do all the maths you want, but you can't beat experience.
     
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  7. kakinami

    kakinami Regular Member

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    I recommend you do what feels best to you. You are probably the best judge of your string jobs. You see yourself everyday. You help yourself eat and drink, pee and poo. You brush your teeth, you comb your hair, sometimes you might do a rocket air (for any Animal Chin fans). I recommend you string how you feel your rackets feel the best, if you like your straight up tension, then do it straight up. If you feel you like the 10% method then do that. If you like the Yonex 2 piece or Haribito, or even if you like the AK modified Yonex pattern with the Yonex modified loop tying on a cross method. You shouldn't listen to other stringers tell you what they think is best. Play with your tensions and see what feels best to you. That is what I recommend you do for finding what tensions are best for you and your customers.

    Sent from my SC-01L using Tapatalk
     
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