whose shot is this 5th shot after my partner serves

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by ralphz, Oct 8, 2019.

  1. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    let's say in doubles my partner serves low(shot 1), they drive it straight(shot 2), it passes him, and is to my backhand side, I take it on my backhand and hit it straight(shoe 3) it goes low over the net and would land between the service line and the net, they get it and do a net shot(shot 4)

    Now for shot 5. Is that mine or my partners? i.e. should I have moved straight forward after my backhand?
     
  2. llrr

    llrr Regular Member

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    That should be your partner's shot. Assuming your backhand drop shot has good angle and speed, so it's decent quality, then it's an attacking shot and your partner should cover the net. Anything going cross court over his head can easily be hit by you again.
     
  3. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    There is no backhand drop. Nobody lifted or cleared the shuttle. A drop is a shot that starts high and goes low. This is a shot that is flat but doesn't go far past the net. It's like a block to the net. I'm not sure if one would call it attacking.. If the opponent anticipates it then they could attack it but if the opponent is slow to the net and to the shuttle and can't attack it (Which is this scenario), so they net it. Then I don't know if you might describe it as attacking. But it's not a drop.
     
  4. llrr

    llrr Regular Member

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    Hmm, in that case it's debatable. It depends on if your partner has stayed close to the net or not, depends on if you've moved forward with the shot or not. Depends on too many factors.
     
  5. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    should they?
     
  6. llrr

    llrr Regular Member

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    I don't see why they wouldn't be. At no point in the rally you became defensive so he should keep the pressure up and stay at the net.
     
  7. SSSSNT

    SSSSNT Regular Member

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    Yeah I agree. Your partner might've taken a step back but should still be covering the net.
     
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  8. rulebavaria

    rulebavaria Regular Member

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    Shot 1: Ok
    Shot 2: Ok
    Shot 3: This shot is your responsibility. A neutral push to the centre would be the better option but your neutral straight push is fine.

    Since the return (Shot 2) is not a shot that put your opponents on the attack, your partner should stay at the net and cover all net replies (Shot 4) to your neutral straight push (Shot 3).
     
  9. Ouchie

    Ouchie Regular Member

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    The quality of shot 3 dictates what happens. If it is loose then your partner probably will not like the idea of being hit in the face so might take a step away from impending pain/humiliation. If it is tight then it will force the opponent to hit the shuttle up which will give your partner the opportunity to pressure/attack the net shot.

    Bear in mind, if I was your opponent I would be attacking the net after shot 3. It is an easy point.
     
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  10. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    It’s the quality of the previous shots in the same scenario that dictates the front player’s behaviour. If in previous points of the game, the blocks haven’t been so good and gone high (so opponent can have easy kills in forecourt), the forecourt partner may be feeling intimidated and back tracking. If it has happened a few times already (or even in previous games), then a conditioned response occurs.
     
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  11. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    well, assuming that hasn't happened. And as I said, they did a net shot response(not a net kill). So my shot wasn't high and loopy.
     
  12. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    Supposing the server is standing at the T, should they step back from the T as soon as the opponents hit shot 2 straight and flat?

    How far should my partner step back from the T?

    If Shot2 had been a lift(i.e. my partner served low and they lift it straight), then I suppose they should step back 100-120cm(1.5 rackets to 2 rackets) from the service line and biasing the side the shuttle is. But the second shot isn't a lift.. The second shot as mentioned in the scenario, is a drive. So then in terms of how far back my partner should step? Should they step back a lot less than that?
     
    #12 ralphz, Oct 9, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
  13. Ouchie

    Ouchie Regular Member

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    It also depends. If your starting position is about an arm and racket length behind the server then you really don't want them to move back towards you whilst you try to swing your racket. The server would be better off staying close to the service line. A lift would be treated as you set it out.

    Why isn't the server attempting to intercept shot 2?


    A little from column A, a little from column B. Some people are easily intimidated, some welcome the challenge. Some people would aim for the body and try to intimidate, some are happier playing stun/block shots at the net.
     
  14. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    good point

    They know they should be. They just failed to intercept.. Can happen for a number of reasons. An error on their part. Maybe they hadn't trained it for a while! Or maybe they only anticipated a net shot or lift on return and weren't ready for the fast one - an error on their part. Maybe their racket was low - an error on their part.

    But we agree they should be trying to intercept. Nevertheless, as mentioned, it passed them.

    I just googled for badminton "column A" and didn't get anything from it so I guess it's not a conventional term.

    Do you mean within the side of the court they are in, the server just moving a little back from the service line?
     
  15. Ouchie

    Ouchie Regular Member

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    It's an idiom. Used when 2 statements have truth.
    As used in popular culture...
     
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  16. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    Sounds like an americanism to me. I have not heard it in the UK.
     
  17. Ouchie

    Ouchie Regular Member

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    You have now. It isn't particularly common anywhere but is probably exported from the US.

    Aaaaaaaanyway...
    [​IMG]
     

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