what is the english and chinese name for this arc like movement?

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by ralphz, Dec 18, 2019.

  1. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    I understand that one way to get to an overhead on the round the head side is to do the flying step '飛步' fēi bù which is a pivot and includes moving while pivoting.

    there's also a slightly slower movement where a player moves in an arc.. in the sense that they make the turn more gradual like


    what's that called?
     
    #1 ralphz, Dec 18, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2019
  2. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    I just realised, I guess in English you'd simply call them running steps. (and its just using running steps while turning)

    Does Chinese have a comprehensive list of terms for footwork?
    e.g. running steps, flying steps, and other footwork terms?
    i'm wondering if the chinese terms are more comprehensive or systematic than the English?
     
  3. asadafgs

    asadafgs Regular Member

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    Never heard fei bu before. If you are referencing pivot plus the small hop on non racket foot, I would just say zhuanshen jia yige dian bu. Shuffle would be bing bu. Running is qian jiaocha. As you can see from the theme, there isn't really a term for things. But you can just describe it, and it flows better in Chinese than English, due to the language.
     
  4. viver

    viver Regular Member

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    There should be standardized technical terms used by Chinese coaches and players. If you have a good command in Mandarin you can find the terms the matches with Chinese commentators. You can also search online for Chinese books on badminton, there should be clear definitions on footwork patterns, designations and detail explanation of different footwork and steps.
     
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  5. asadafgs

    asadafgs Regular Member

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    As a Chinese person with a Chinese coach, we really dont use any fancy terms besides the ones I mentioned. You guys are over analyzing it. For example the fancy name you gave a jump in English China Jump is literally no turn body jump in Chinese.

    Only term I can add to the list is lunge 跨步 and gong jiao bu (no idea if that's right or what it even means).
     
  6. ralphz

    ralphz Regular Member

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    You do have some badminton terminology in chinese As an example of terminology, For example, you brilliantly wrote here https://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/index.php?threads/what-is-a-flick-smash.181733/ "In Chinese, there is zhong sa, Dian sa, and chang sa. Heavy smash, placement smash, and long smash." (and that terminology is pretty organised and clear, too)

    You weren't aware of the term flying step which i've seen here and managed to check up, is called '飛步' fēi bù and it has been mentioned by some others.. i'd guess that the English came from the chinese and not vice versa. Is it possible that perhaps your coach just doesn't use precise terminology for footwork but that it may exist?

    Viver properly understood exactly what I was asking.. though your post #3 didn't, (i'm not asking about how to take english words and explain them to somebody chinese that can't speak English) your post #5 may largely understand what i'm asking.. But clearly there is terminology eg what you said for smashes, and for footwork, flying step in chinese that you hadn't heard of.
     
  7. asadafgs

    asadafgs Regular Member

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    I don't know about fei bu, and I've even trained in china. Fei pao (running while airborne) is a thing though. For example, watch ginting when he smashes. After he swings, you can see that he pulls his right arm back, like a running motion which helps him move forward faster.
     
  8. viver

    viver Regular Member

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    @asadafgs
    Fei bu is not a term that I've learned. Not sure but I think it's the airborne part of the lunge to the net - during the my instruction period it was the 'dang bu' and 'jian bu'.
    China, in my opinion did research, analyze and develop techniques for what we see in today's badminton. I was also trained by Chinese coaches exclusively, first with a provincial (backup national team player), a provincial head coach and also a national level coach. For my training as a badminton coach, a national level (provincial team head coach) conducted the course for over 100 hours and also then another course for badminton coach conducted by another coach that was part of the national developmental group. I never had any issues following the courses because the terms used by the coaches/instructors were consistent throughout the years.
     
  9. Borkya

    Borkya Regular Member

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    I live and train badminton in China (all in chinese). I only started playing in China, so I rarely know the english word (for example the first 6+ months I thought the english for "smash" was "slam," hahaha. I had never heard anyone say it in English and I guess I just thought it was the same as a tennis term.)

    I also have never heard fei bu spoken by my coach or anyone I play with. Just to add my 2 cents. Although I can't think of a special term that would describe what your initial questions was either. Not sure if there is such a specific term, but in my training and daily life, no one uses an exact word (doesn't mean it doesn't exist, just means it's not common nomenclature.)
     

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